LeominsterHereford

Leoher four
Verified route

Verified Slow Way

Verified by 50.00% of reviewers

By nichowes on 04 Sep 2023


Distance

29km/18mi

Ascent

-

Descent

-

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So far it has been reviewed by six people and surveyed by zero people and there are three issues flagged with this route.

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Description

This is Leoher four, the place from which to download the revised, safe, accurate route .gpx for unpassable Leoher three, on which footpath closures took place place in summer 2022, with safe diversions now in place on Leoher four..

Photo one shows footbridge at GR SO 49455 56493 amid S&A Farms, onto closed, dangerous footpath; do not cross this footbridge but follow the safe, revised route as shown by the dashed line on the map in photo two (in which the footbridge is located at point B). The former stile/gate near point A on the map was completely overgrown and invisible from the dashed line route when Nic Howes visited in August 2023.

Leoher four was trialled in two sections in January 2022. The section from Wellington to Hereford was trialled by me and Dan Cox and the section from Leominster to Wellington was trialled by me alone. Local bus transport was used in both trial walks to enable point to point walking.

Leoher four includes a different route from Leominster to Upper Hill, avoiding Leoher two's long section of walking out of Leominster on country roads with no footway. Leoher four includes S&A's farm at Brierley, a large man-made lake with interesting wildfowl and a steep woodland bank crowned by a large hill fort with intact ramparts.

Leoher four also includes a more interesting - and quieter - route than Leoher two into Hereford from the latter's outskirts. From Holmer village the route avoids the busy, noisy A49 and follows quiet lanes, a footpath through Hereford's northern industrial quarter and paths around Widemarsh Common to finish at Hereford Town Hall.

Issues became increasingly obvious with northern sections of Leoher three. These issues have now been addressed by Leominster Parish Council, PROW team, Nic Howes and Neil Summerskill, and are now avoided with a detour that is mapped by the .gpx downloadable from Leoher four, here.

There is an unmarked, untrodden public footpath route across arable fields between the pond south of Westhope Hill and Brickyard Cottage. It is much easier to stick on the roughly parallel tractor way which leads through an uninhabited yard and barns near The Cotts Farm before rejoining a public right of way

This is Leoher four, the place from which to download the revised, safe, accurate route .gpx for unpassable Leoher three, on which footpath closures took place place in summer 2022, with safe diversions now in place on Leoher four..

Photo one shows footbridge at GR SO 49455 56493 amid S&A Farms, onto closed, dangerous footpath; do not cross this footbridge but follow the safe, revised route as shown by the dashed line on the map in photo two (in which the footbridge is located at point B). The former stile/gate near point A on the map was completely overgrown and invisible from the dashed line route when Nic Howes visited in August 2023.

Leoher four was trialled in two sections in January 2022. The section from Wellington to Hereford was trialled by me and Dan Cox and the section from Leominster to Wellington was trialled by me alone. Local bus transport was used in both trial walks to enable point to point walking.

Leoher four includes a different route from Leominster to Upper Hill, avoiding Leoher two's long section of walking out of Leominster on country roads with no footway. Leoher four includes S&A's farm at Brierley, a large man-made lake with interesting wildfowl and a steep woodland bank crowned by a large hill fort with intact ramparts.

Leoher four also includes a more interesting - and quieter - route than Leoher two into Hereford from the latter's outskirts. From Holmer village the route avoids the busy, noisy A49 and follows quiet lanes, a footpath through Hereford's northern industrial quarter and paths around Widemarsh Common to finish at Hereford Town Hall.

Issues became increasingly obvious with northern sections of Leoher three. These issues have now been addressed by Leominster Parish Council, PROW team, Nic Howes and Neil Summerskill, and are now avoided with a detour that is mapped by the .gpx downloadable from Leoher four, here.

There is an unmarked, untrodden public footpath route across arable fields between the pond south of Westhope Hill and Brickyard Cottage. It is much easier to stick on the roughly parallel tractor way which leads through an uninhabited yard and barns near The Cotts Farm before rejoining a public right of way

Status

This route has been reviewed by 6 people.

This route has potentially been flagged (3 times) for reasons relating to access.

Photos for Leoher four

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Information

Verified route

Route status - Live

Reviews - 6

Average rating -

Is this route good enough? -  Yes (3) Maybe (3)

Problems reported -  Access (3)

Downloads - 1

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Geography information system (GIS) data

Total length

Maximum elevation

Minimum elevation

Start and end points

Leominster
Grid Ref SO4969059026
Lat / Lon 52.22714° / -2.73798°
Easting / Northing 349,690E / 259,026N
What3Words relishing.sports.truth
Hereford
Grid Ref SO5119339982
Lat / Lon 52.05607° / -2.71324°
Easting / Northing 351,193E / 239,982N
What3Words froze.prop.skinny

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reviews


HuwG

18 Jun 2024 Spring

As a summer walk this is is great- highlights are walking up Wellington Wood and across Westhope Common.


J Walker

31 Mar 2024 Spring

Flooded start made near impassable - need wellies in wet weather. Impressive hill fort after Brierley Wood. Descent from fort gives great views. Fields pleasant as far as Yoke Wood. Slippy climb to West Hope Hill but well worth it. Followed telegraph poles from Cotts past Brickyard Cottages into Wellington Wood and down into village. Slightly disappointed no pub but stopped off for refreshments at PO/community shop. Began re-route across A49 but soon impassable due to flooding, Back-tracked to Wellington and followed footpaths and lanes into Hereford from there.


C Hanson

31 Mar 2024 Spring

We tackled this long route in two parts; the first on a rainy day towards the end of an unusually rainy March. The route out of Leominster along the B4361 was straightforward enough but we encountered problems almost as soon as the path left the main road at the River Arrow through a plantation of poplar trees. The river had overflowed and the ground under our feet became boggy and frankly would have been impassable for me if one of our group, wisely in wellies, hadn’t kindly piggy-backed us across the swamp. This took quite a while as she had to plonk me down on a log every few seconds for a rest - I tried not to take offence. We managed to reconnect with the route in the next field as it passed along the side of poly tunnels of strawberries, and then rose up behind Brickhouse farm to Brierley Wood. Great views here which gave us a full sense of the extent of the flooding in the valley below. The next section through the wood and along the ridge culminates at the remains of an ancient fort then swoops down through fields with views towards the west. From Chapel Farm the path rises again through trees on a path that the rain had turned into a red slick of mud - hard going that day, but it leads onto the great expanse of Westhope Hill and stunning 360 degree views. The route stays high, following a line of telegraph poles before descending into the magical Wellington Wood and down into Wellington itself. The pub here has been closed for years, but the friendly Post Office and Community Shop has a good range of drinks and snacks, tables outside and a toilet. We toasted the end of the walk here with a bottle of red while waiting for the last bus to take us back to Leominster.

This is an excellent route but I would recommend not attempting it (at least the first part) after prolonged rainfall unless you have wellies and long legs, or know someone who does!

We began the final leg of the route in beautiful Easter sunshine from outside the post office in Wellington. (last four photos)Perhaps it was the brilliance of the weather that prevented us from noticing the nature of the land we were about to walk through on the other side of the A49 - so much blue around the sand and gravel works, so many coils in the river Lugg and not an inkling of what we were in for? Looking at it now I find it hard to believe that after a month in which it had rained almost incessantly and particularly after our experience on the first leg of this route, we didn’t expect the floods - flooded footpaths, flooded roads, fields of red water everywhere. We tried, we really tried with a kind of blind desperation to get to Hereford, only to find ourselves stranded and soggy by the railway line. We were rescued by a kind woman in a 4x4 who said she expected the water to stay high for at least 10 days. She also told us, as she deposited us back at the side of the A49, that floods such as these were becoming increasingly common; her family had gated the road to prevent cars from attempting to pass through, so fed up were they of rescuing the occupants. We almost went home but the day was so beautiful and this was the last leg of a long trek, so we plotted an alternative route from Wellington which stayed on the west side of the A49 following lanes and footpaths through Burghill to enter Hereford via the Moor Park area. This was a beautiful route right to the outskirts of the city. We will attempt to submit it as a rainy/flood day alternative to this one.


J Mitchell

29 Mar 2024 (edited 31 Mar 2024) Spring

This route was done in 2 sections. I've given 5 stars for scenery and interest but much of the route is impassable. It's a seasonal route. The turn-off at Broadward Bridge just past Broadward Hall leads down a small incline to a wood/plantation through which a tributary of the River Arrow flows. On March 28th 2024 it was very flooded, the wood boggy and knee high in water. I was wearing wellies and still had to do a Crystal Maze on tussocks and fallen trunks. The steps to footbridges were submerged. I heroically gave piggybacks to my party - which was entertaining but, unless you're wearing wellies, forget the bit between Broadward Bridge and S&A Farms polytunnels just before Brierley in months of heavy rain. Alternatively, you could walk down the Hereford Rd (B4361) for a bit further, but there is no pavement and the verge is narrow, so not ideal.
The walk through Brierley wood to the fort is fine. Some lovely old and well-kept farms and fields on the way to Upper Hill. Then, my oh my, a rise up on a wooded track at Chapel Farm into fantabulous Yoke Wood. It was a river of orange clay yesterday, squelch squelch. Had no traction on the wellies and a bit of a work-out (though previous piggybacking had perhaps worn me out - guilt-tripping my party here!). Emerging out of Yoke Wood into the open common ground past the spring on Westhope Hill was an unexpected delight with great views west. Elemental. The path through fields to Cotts Farm were obscured even with a low-lying crop, so we took the farm track which brings you out at the same point anyway. The final amazeballs was Wellington Wood. Deciduous, ancient, peaceful, secluded - very special. A lovely holloway - which is now a private road to Stone House Scotland - which you don't walk down but can see from the path alongside it to Wellington Village. The pub there has closed down but the woman in the very-well equipped P.O there told us the community were trying to buy it.
From Wellington the path crosses the A49 and takes you between a series of ponds at the gravel and sand works. This was completely unpassable on 30th March 2024 due to flooding. We tried every possible track and lane this side of the A49 to reach Moreton-on-Lugg but the water was, at best, knee high. We were very disappointed as this was the last day of a walk from Chester to Hereford. At one point we crossed a stream by climbing across sticks and logs brought downstream by the floods and emerged at Wellington Crossing only to find deeper flood water blocked all ways out from there. Thanks to the woman who lived at the level crossing, who said Moreton-on-Lugg was also impassable on foot due to floods, we got a lift in her 4x4 ("we're self sufficient; this is nothing compared to the water we've seen the last 6 months") back to the A49. From here we took an alternative route from Wellington to Hereford on the west side of the A49 via Auberrow-Portway-Burghill - which was scenic, lovely grand old houses and walled gardens. Recommend this when there's flooding. Photos below include the flooded route and the alternative via Portway (the photos without water in them are the alternative route.).

  • nichowes

    Nichowes

    29 Mar 2024

    Thanks very much for the review and consequent snail (i.e. verification) for this route, J Mitchell. It seems that any PROW in the lower Lugg valley now has to be seen as seasonal, given the ongoing impact of anthropogenic climate change. A lengthy section of road walking out of Leominster along Ryelands Lane and on to Ivington bypasses the sodden fields, features in Leoher one and connects with Leoher four at the hill fort.

  • nichowes

    Nichowes

    29 Mar 2024

    Sorry - that should have been "...features in Leoher two..."

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Nichowes

04 Sep 2023 Summer

A great walk that has taken a great deal of negotiation to clear safe passage (see description for more information). Photo one shows Dinmore Manor from an unusual direction (WSW). Photo two shows winter afternoon light through the trees of fine Wellington Wood. Photo three shows snowdrops in Wellington churchyard.


Neil Summersgill

31 Aug 2023 Summer

This corrects the safety issues of LeoHer2. I caught the train from Leominster to Hereford in the morning, Beryl biked (Hereford's rent a bike for a trip scheme) to near Holmer and walked back to Leominster. This is a good walk with some great views to the Black Mountains near Hereford. At Westhope Hill there are great views all the way from the Malverns - Bromyard Downs - Titterstone Clee Hill - Brown Clee Hill - good spot for a picnic. There are two sizeable woods en route and a couple of nice villages towards Hereford to look round. Before the hill up to Wellington Wood there is a stile with barbed wire across it so beware (I have reported it). Due to the time of the year when I got near to Cotts Farm I couldn't find the fork north in the footpath through a dense field of "black beans" - so I followed the southern edge of the field following the telegraph poles to get to Cotts Farm. The path continues almost in parallel to the main route and then a clear path goes north to link you back to the main route. Maybe when you go the beans will be gone and you won't have any issue ! Its a fairly easy to route to follow with no major challenges.


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Leominster—Hereford

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Ascent

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Descent

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Leoher three

Distance

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Ascent

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Descent

-

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