PyecombeBurgess Hill

Pyebur one
Verified route

Verified Slow Way

Verified by 83.33% of reviewers

By a Slow Ways Volunteer on 07 Apr 2021


Distance

8km/5mi

Ascent

147m

Descent

83m

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Description

This is a Slow Ways route connecting Pyecombe and Burgess Hill.

Know of a better route? Share it here.

This is a Slow Ways route connecting Pyecombe and Burgess Hill.

Know of a better route? Share it here.

Status

This route has been reviewed by 6 people.

This route has been flagged (1 times) for reasons relating to accuracy.

Photos for Pyebur one

Photos of this route will appear when they are added to a review. You can review this route here.


Information

Verified route

Route status - Live

Reviews - 6

Average rating -

Is this route good enough? -  Yes (5) No (1)

Problems reported -  Accuracy (1)

Downloads - 7

Surveys

What is this route like?

Surveys are submitted by fellow users of this website and show what you might expect from this Slow Ways route. Scroll down the page to read more detailed surveys.

Grade 3X based on 1 surveys Sign up or log in to survey this route.
Description Note
Grade 3: Route includes rough surfaces that may include small boulders, potholes, shallow ruts, loose gravel, short muddy sections.
Access grade X: At least one stile, flight of steps or other obstacle that is highly likely to block access for wheelchair and scooter users.
Grading is based on average scores by surveyors. This slow way has 1 surveys.
Full grading description

Only people who have completed our training can become Slow Ways surveyors and submit a survey. We do not vet contributors, so we cannot guarantee the quality or completeness of the surveys they complete. If you are dependent on the information being correct we recommend reading and comparing surveys before setting off.

Survey Photos

Facilities

Facilities in the middle third of this route.

Present at time of survey Public toilet (1)
Maybe present Wheelchair accessible toilet (1)
Present at time of survey Supermarket (1)
Present at time of survey Restaurant (1)
Maybe present Vegan restaurant (1)
Maybe present Accommodation (1)
Maybe present Accommodation < £50 (1)
Not present at time of survey Campsite (1)
Not present at time of survey Bothy (1)
Maybe present Free wifi (1)
Maybe present Public phone (1)
Present at time of survey Mobile phone coverage (1)
Present at time of survey Train station (1)
Not present at time of survey Bench (1)
Not present at time of survey Picnic table (1)
Present at time of survey Bus stop (1)
Not present at time of survey Ferry (1)

Challenges

Potential challenges reported on this route. Some challenges are seasonal.

Not present at time of survey Scrambling (1)
Not present at time of survey Wading (1)
Not present at time of survey Swimming (1)
Not present at time of survey Climbing (1)
Not present at time of survey Stepping stones (1)
Present at time of survey Very slippery (1)
Present at time of survey Very muddy (1)
Maybe present Very icy (1)
Maybe present Likely to flood (1)
Not present at time of survey Long grass sections (1)
Not present at time of survey Crops encroaching on path (1)
Not present at time of survey Diverted path (1)

Obstacles

Obstacles on this route.

Present at time of survey Stiles (1)
Present at time of survey Step and kerbs (1)
Present at time of survey Possible to avoid steps, if applicable (1)
Present at time of survey Flights of steps (1)
Present at time of survey Gates (1)
Not present at time of survey Kissing gates (1)
Not present at time of survey Locked gates (1)
Not present at time of survey Disables access gates (1)
Present at time of survey Cycle barriers (1)
Not present at time of survey Ladders (1)
Not present at time of survey Cattle grids (1)
Not present at time of survey Fords (1)
Not present at time of survey Narrow bridges (1)
Not present at time of survey Ferry required (1)
Present at time of survey Acceptable road walking (1)
Not present at time of survey Unacceptable road walking (1)
Present at time of survey Dangerous road crossings (1)
Present at time of survey Walking on paths beside roads (1)
Present at time of survey Walking on verges beside roads (1)
Not present at time of survey Railway crossings (1)
Not present at time of survey River crossings (1)
Not present at time of survey Cattle possible (1)
Present at time of survey Horses possible (1)
Not present at time of survey Tidal area (1)
Not present at time of survey Potential falls (1)
Not present at time of survey Exposed to elements (1)
Not present at time of survey Remote area (1)
Not present at time of survey Mountainous area (1)
Not present at time of survey Military training area (1)
Not present at time of survey No visible path (1)
Not present at time of survey Seasonal nesting birds (1)
Not present at time of survey Other hazards (1)

Accessibility

Is this route step and stile free?

Not present at time of survey Free of stiles (1)
Present at time of survey Free of single steps/kerbs (1)
Not present at time of survey Free of flights of steps (1)
Not present at time of survey Free of other obstacles (1)

Measurements

Surveyors were asked to measure the narrowest and steepest parts of paths.

Narrowest part of path: no data

The steepest uphill gradient East: no data

The steepest uphill gradient West: no data

The steepest camber: no data

How clear is the waymarking on the route: Clear (1)

Successfully completed

We asked route surveyors "Have you successfully completed this route with any of the following? If so, would you recommend it to someone with the same requirements?". Here is how they replied.

Small Pug-sized dog (0)
Small Labrador-sized dog (0)
Large St. Bernard-sized dog (0)
Standard pram (0)
Off-road rugged pram (0)
Standard wheelchair (0)
Off-road rugged wheelchair (0)
Standard mobility scooter (0)
Off-road rugged mobility scooter (0)

Recommended by an expert

We asked route surveyors "Are you a trained access professional, officer or expert? If so, is this route suitable for someone travelling with any of the following?" Here is how they replied.

Small Pug-sized dog (0)
Small Labrador-sized dog (0)
Large St. Bernard-sized dog (0)
Standard pram (0)
Off-road rugged pram (0)
Standard wheelchair (0)
Off-road rugged wheelchair (0)
Standard mobility scooter (0)
Off-road rugged mobility scooter (0)

Terrain

We asked route surveyors to estimate how much of the route goes through different kinds of terrain.

35.0% of the route is on roads (1)

15.0% of the route is lit at night (1)

35.0% of the route is paved (1)

20.0% of the route is muddy (1)

10.0% of the route is over rough ground (1)

There is no data on long grass

Report a problem with this data

1 surveys

Information from verified surveys.

3X December 2021 by Bostal Boy
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Geography information system (GIS) data

Total length

Maximum elevation

Minimum elevation

Start and end points

Pyecombe
Grid Ref TQ2922312657
Lat / Lon 50.89894° / -0.16374°
Easting / Northing 529,223E / 112,657N
What3Words unlucky.forensic.gadget
Burgess Hill
Grid Ref TQ3162618821
Lat / Lon 50.95379° / -0.12737°
Easting / Northing 531,626E / 118,821N
What3Words snowmen.protected.leathers

Pyebur One's land is

Arable 5.3%
Pasture 61.4%
Urban 33.3%

Data: Corine Land Cover (CLC) 2018

reviews


James Butcher

22 May 2023 Spring

This route is listed as Pyecombe to Burgess Hill but we did it in reverse, which I think is the better route anyway because of the views of the Downs you encounter in the second half of the walk.

I won't revisit the whole route itself as others have done so, I would recommend having a read of BostalBoy's review for some useful notes, though I would note that he did his in December and we have just completed this in May, and the greenery is spectacular at this time of year.

This route is wonderfully efficient and straight, there is a section on the road between the southern end of Burgess Hill and the top of Hassocks but this is pleasant enough - there is a shared use cycle path that is relatively wide and far enough away from the road that I would do this walk with my child. The walk really becomes interesting once you start to leave Hassocks and the view opens up of the South Downs, which, as others have commented, seem so close! You cross the A273, which is a busy road but we managed perfectly easily and safely, and you get a wonderful view of the Clayton Tunnel entrance, in all its gothic-castle glory.

After this the path leads up over the hill on a wonderfully secluded pathway, with fields to the right and woodland ahead. It is a little steep but not for long, seasoned walkers will not bat an eyelid at it. Once over the crest of the hill you start to get views on both sides, and unfortunately hear the traffic from the main road. There are a few pathway crossroads to navigate but basically just 'straight on' and you quickly arrive in Pyecombe. Once there, make your way to the Plough for a refreshing drink or one of their tasty pizzas.

The route took us about 1hr 45mins at a leisurely pace. We found the route accurate, safe and we would walk it again.

Walkers not familiar with Pyecombe should plan their return or onward journey from here as it is not near a railway station.


Ricky Coleman

22 Oct 2022 Autumn

There is one fairly clear problem with the route - the GPX file starts in Burgess Hill and finishes at the start point. If you add it to your gps watch at the start of the walk, it’ll think you’ve finished the route and end navigation.

The route itself is a direct but probably not the most scenic, going as it does along a busy road for about 1 mile. No criticism of the route designer, there just isn’t an alternative.

The path from Pyecombe is very rutted and unsteady underfoot in the wet, but it is an enjoyable walk with plenty of cafes and shops in hassocks around the half way point. Not bad to get from A to B but there are more scenic walks nearby.


Ingrina

24 Jul 2022 Summer

A mostly good, direct, pleasant route between Burgess Hill and Hassocks. The directions are very easy to follow and the paths are fairly well maintained. The segment along the road after Hassocks can be quite noisy due to the speed of the traffic, but you aren't on it for very long, and the path after you turn off towards Burgess Hill is really lovely. Crossing the A273 is the only bad bit of the route, but the rest are fairly easy to navigate. Loved the path by the railway as you get closer to Burgess Hill station.


David Sanderson

10 May 2022 Spring

Remarkably direct route which we started from Burgess Hill and broke in Hassocks. The start is a series of footpaths to the side of the railway past some quite historic buildings. As you reach the southern edges of Burgess Hill, you cross Nightingale Lane Nature Reserve which has some great views of the South Downs, which suddenly seem much closer. You join the pavement of London Road for a while. There was some suggestions amongst the party of possibly avoiding this or at least reducing it. Speaking as the volunteer who plotted this, my thinking was that an alternative would be too indirect, created problems linking to Hassocks Station and that the pavement section was quite short in the context of the whole walk. The Friars Oak pub marks your arrival on the edge of Hassocks and the route takes you via residential streets to Hassocks Station. From the station a set of steps lead down to the main road which you then cross to go offroad again. The footpath is a popular walk which follows the railway through Butchers and Lag Wood until you get to Clayton and the Jack and Jill Pub. Near the end of the footpath my fellow walkers invited me mount a railway bridge, which we didn't cross. They pointed out carvings in the brick made by Canadian Soldiers stationed locally during the Second World War. Brighton Road is 40mph and has no pedestrian crossing but is easy to cross with care. New Way Lane is mostly straight, open and isn't used much by motor vehicles. We mostly encountered cyclists. The bridleway which takes you all the way to Pyecombe is steep but shaded. Your pace will slow to climb it, but the views are stunning. The woods echoed to the sound of "yaffles" (woodpeckers). There are a couple of panoramic spots before you reach Pyecombe itself, which we found busy with bikers and a few other walkers. This route is varied, direct and safe. It is full of history, wildlife and views and has pubs and shops in Burgess Hill, Hassocks and Clayton. Definitely worth a snail!.


Bostal Boy

30 Dec 2021 Winter

Walked from Burgess Hill to Pyecombe on a grey and drizzly day in December. Away from Burgess Hill station the route uses a footpath heading South alongside the railway line. It has recently been surfaced as far as London Road. However, it has a low stile halfway along which appears to serve no purpose than to reduce accessibility otherwise improved by the resurfacing … bonkers!

On reaching London Road, the route heads South again using the cycleway / pavement beside the busy A273. This is followed for a mile or so past the Friar’s Oak pub. When it reaches the outskirts of Hassocks, it is directed by a pedestrian and cycle sign for a cut through residential streets to Hassocks Station. Hassocks is a large village with shops, cafes, the Hassocks Hotel (pub) and public lavatories at Adastra Park, about a half mile off route.

From the station, steep steps take you down from the railway line to the road passing beneath. The steps can be avoided by using the car access ramp which is a bit of a detour. The footpath to the South Downs is well-signed across the road. Climb some more steps, then take another long, straight footpath beside the railway to reach Clayton Tunnel. The footpath is susceptible to developing large deep puddles after periods of wet weather.

The entrance to the tunnel dates from 1841 and is a celebrated feature of the London to Brighton line with two gothic castle towers and a small cottage between them directly above the tracks. The tunnel was the scene of the worst railway accident to that point on 25/08/1861 when three trains ran into the back of each other killing 23 people and injuring 176.

Pass the Jack and Jill pub named after the famous pair of windmills which can been seen on top of the Downs nearby on most days … not today. Head along the lane on the left before the pub for 400m then take the bridle path on the left heading up onto the Downs. This is a typically steep South Downs bostal of chalk and flint which can be muddy and slippery after wet weather. Head up an over with views of Wolstonbury Hill on your right. Once over the ridge head straight ahead into a coombe valley to reach the small picturesque village of Pyecombe.

Well-traced on the map and easily followed. I have done the second half from Hassocks on numerous occasions. I would suggest that most users will be starting from Hassocks Station and heading up onto the Downs which is the best section of the walk.


BecciWest

01 Jul 2021 Summer

We walked this route the day after heavy rain and in some places, especially on the path from Clayton Bridge to Hassocks it was flooded and hard to pass through, impossible without wellies (see photo) but the rest of the path was concrete so I think this was just bad timing. First half of the walk is quite steep, second half, especially from Hassocks is on concrete or all weather surface, the part near Burgess Hill looks like it has been recently re surfaced. Walking along side the A273 was better than I thought it would be, lots of traffic but there is a good cycle/foot path so very safe. Most of the route is close to the railway and it goes past the clayton tunnel which anyone who likes trains will enjoy seeing.


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